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Category: London

Tramshed.

Steak and chicken are the order of the day at Tramshed. The menu is simple – seasonal sharing starters, followed by chicken or steak .

Yesterday we teamed up at the mezzanine floor for a Citizens of Humanity elevated private dining with views of the restaurant and the specially commissioned artwork by Damien Hirst featuring of course, a cow and a cockerel.

To celebrate the opening of Tramshed, Damien Hirst created a sculpture specifically for the restaurant. ‘Cock and Bull’ (2012). A Hereford cow and cockerel preserved in a steel and glass tank of formaldehyde – is installed 4 metres above diners. The work forms part of the ‘Natural History’ series, Hirst’s seminal collection of preserved animals.

Alongside Hirst’s monumental formaldehyde work, the artist has created a painting entitled ‘Beef and Chicken’ (2012) specifically for the restaurant. Installed at the mezzanine level, the painting depicts the 1990s cartoon characters ‘Cow and Chicken’ (Cartoon Network).

Take a walk downstairs to see our very own The Cock ‘n’ Bull Art Gallery. Mark Hix is known for his love of art and the exhibitions change every 6 weeks.

The famous grade-2 listed tramshed building on Garden Walk and Rivington Street was designed by Vincent Harris and built in 1905 as an electricity generating facility for the Tramway System.

Away from the restaurant is Mark’s Library Kitchen. As the name suggests Mark’s extensive cookery book collection surrounds the walls of his demonstration kitchen. Here, Mark is hosting exclusive one-night only events this autumn, collaborating with celebrated chefs from across the country to demonstrate and cook a 4 course meal with wine to match.

The latest addition to the artwork at Tramshed comes in the form of street art from RUN (a wall painter from Italy) and Dscreet (A graffiti artist from Australia who paints owls). As I learned yesterday during a Street Art tour in East London.

WIN A CHICKEN!

Afbeelding

Afbeelding

Afbeelding

Afbeelding

Pizza.

I just ate one of the best pizza’s in town, just love stori deli in Shoreditch, London.

Besides the fact that the pizza’s are so incredibly tasty and have great thin and crispy layers. I also like the laid-back look and feel of the place and the creative solutions they’ve come up with when it comes to low-budget interior decorating.

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The Shed.

The brother duo, Oliver and Richard Gladwin created The Shed , a restaurant that is an extension of their rural lifestyle back in Nutbourne, West Sussex.

They have put together a fantastic daily-changing menu of Sussex produce sourced from their youngest brother (whose roots are firmly planted in Nutbourne as a farmer) and other local suppliers. Small plates of Oliver’s flair cookery star on the menu – sticky spatchcock quail, mouthfuls of mackerel sashimi, rabbit ravioli… the list goes on. Focussing on using the whole animal (nose to tail cooking) is essential to them, nothing is wasted in The Shed kitchen.

Don’t forget to try their home-made cocktails and the raspberry cheese cake!

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MILES ALDRIDGE.

This summer, Somerset House hosts ‘I Only Want You to Love Me’ – a major retrospective of photographer Miles Aldridge‘s work, to coincide with the publication of the book by the same name, published by Rizzoli. This is the largest exhibition of his work to date and will include large-scale photographic prints from throughout his career including previously unpublished material as well as hand-drawn story-boards, drawings, polaroids and magazines, offering an intimate insight into Aldridge’s point of view and process.

Women and colour are Aldridge’s twin obsessions. His work is filled with glamorous, beautiful women from dazed housewives and decadent beauties to sunbathing sexpots and ecstatic Virgin Marys. Luscious colours dazzle from every image – blood red ketchup splashes against a black and white floor; a mouth drips with gold; egg yolk oozes across a plate. But the technicolour dream world of seemingly perfect women with blank expressions belies a deeper sense of disturbance and neurosis. Look more closely and there is silent screaming, a head pushed down on a bed, a face covered in polythene, a woman pushing an empty swing.

Aldridge’s work has never been constrained by the demands of the fashion world. Working like an auteur filmmaker, his view of the world is wide and deep. His many influences include film directors such as David Lynch and Federico Fellini; the styled elegance of fashion photographer Richard Avedon and the psychedelic illustrations of his father, Alan Aldridge. Each image is immaculately crafted, often starting with story-board drawings so that the final image lies somewhere between cinema and photography.

Born in London in 1964, Aldridge studied illustration at Central St Martins, and briefly directed music videos before becoming a fashion photographer in the mid-90s. He has published his work in many influential magazines including Vogue Italia, American Vogue, Numéro, The New York Times and The New Yorker. His work was showcased in Weird Beauty at the International Center for Photography in New York in 2009, and he has works in the permanent collection of the National Portrait Gallery, London and the Victoria & Albert Museum, London.

Reflex Art Gallery Amsterdam will show his latest work during next edition of Unseen Photo Fair Amsterdam

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The Art of Food.

This summer, Somerset House is hosting a major retrospective exhibition on a global icon of gastronomy, Ferran Adrià, and the restaurant he built to become the world’s best, elBulli. In partnership with Estrella Damm, elBulli: Ferran Adrià and The Art of Food is the world’s first exhibition dedicated to a chef and his restaurant. The retrospective showcases the art of cuisine and cuisine as art by taking a behind-the-scenes look at the legendary laboratory and kitchen of the internationally renowned restaurant, which delighted diners in Cala Montjoi, a small picturesque bay on the Catalan coast near Roses, for over 50 years.

Charting the evolution of elBulli, the exhibition features an in-depth, multimedia display of each of the essential ingredients that make up the culinary creative mastermind of Ferran Adrià and his team: research (handwritten notes and hand-drawn sketches); preparation (plasticine models, which were made for all the dishes served as a means for quality control of colour, portion size and position on the plate, and the specially-designed utensils used); presentation (original tasting menus, cutlery laid on the tables and salivating shots of the creations taken from the catalogue to be published by Phaidon next year), and plaudits (original restaurant reviews and other press clippings). Combined with archive footage of the chefs and clientele, the exhibition’s ephemera are testament to Adrià’s abundant talent, genius and ambition.

Adrià said of the Somerset House show: “Even though the restaurant of elBulli is now closed, the spirit of elBulli is still very much alive and this exhibition is one of the ways of keeping it so. For some, I hope it will revive good memories, and for others it will give a flavour of a fine dining experience like no other. Overall, it is an ode to the creativity, imagination, innovation, talent and teamwork of everyone at elBulli, but especially the world-famous chefs who trained with us and took these values into their own restaurants around the world.

“I am delighted to be presenting it in London at the prestigious Somerset House, another creative hub which, like elBulli, always invites you to try something new and perhaps a little unpredictable.”

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Grain Store, London.

Grain Store is the hotly anticipated restaurant by Chef Bruno Loubet and The Zetter Group’s Michael Benyan and Mark Sainsbury. Following on from the extraordinary success of The Zetter Townhouse, they have once again, joined forces with pioneering drinks creator Tony Conigliaro. The restaurant is located on Granary Square at the heart of London’s most exciting new quarter, King’s Cross.

About the food: There are no geographical boundaries to the influences that have inspired the eclectic menu. It’s the culmination of Bruno Loubet’s extensive travels and the years dedicated to his beloved vegetable patch. Although many dishes have a meat or fish element, this menu gives vegetables equal billing, if not the starring role. Really try the vegetable merguez and the fresh mint and courgette frittata!

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